A History of Force Feeding

Hunger Strikes, Prisons and Medical Ethics, 1909–1974

by Ian Miller

DescriptionDetailsHashtagsReport an issue

Book Description

This book is the first monograph-length study of the force-feeding of hunger strikers in English, Irish and Northern Irish prisons. It examines ethical debates that arose throughout the twentieth century when governments authorised the force-feeding of imprisoned suffragettes, Irish republicans and convict prisoners. It also explores the fraught role of prison doctors called upon to perform the procedure. Since the Home Office first authorised force-feeding in 1909, a number of questions have been raised about the procedure. Is force-feeding safe? Can it kill? Are doctors who feed prisoners against their will abandoning the medical ethical norms of their profession? And do state bodies use prison doctors to help tackle political dissidence at times of political crisis?

This open book is licensed under a Creative Commons License (CC BY). You can download A History of Force Feeding ebook for free in PDF format (2.6 MB).

Book Details

Subject
History
Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan
Published
2016
Pages
267
Edition
1
Language
English
ISBN13
9783319311128
ISBN10
3319311123
ISBN13 Digital
9783319311135
ISBN10 Digital
3319311131
PDF Size
2.6 MB
License
CC BY

Related Books

The Golden and Ghoulish Age of the Gibbet in Britain
This book is the first academic study of the post-mortem practice of gibbeting ('hanging in chains'), since the nineteenth century. Gibbeting involved placing the executed body of a malefactor in an iron cage and suspending it from a tall post. A body might remain in the gibbet for many decades, while it gradually fell to pieces. Hanging in chains ...
Harnessing the Power of the Criminal Corpse
This book is the culmination of many years of research on what happened to the bodies of executed criminals in the past. Focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it looks at the consequences of the 1752 Murder Act. These criminal bodies had a crucial role in the history of medicine, and the history of crime, and great symbolic resonance...
A History of Self-Harm in Britain
This book fall of various self-harming behaviours in twentieth-century Britain. It puts self-cutting and overdosing into historical perspective, linking them to the huge changes that occur in mental and physical healthcare, social work and wider politics....
Computation and the Humanities
This book addresses the application of computing to cultural heritage and the discipline of Digital Humanities that formed around it. Digital Humanities research is transforming how the Human record can be transmitted, shaped, understood, questioned and imagined and it has been ongoing for more than 70 years. However, we have no comprehensive histo...
A History of Radionuclide Studies in the UK
The British Nuclear Medicine Society celebrates its 50th Anniversary with this booklet, which reflects the research of many of the pioneers in the use of radionuclides for the diagnosis and therapy of human disease. Since 1949 there have been remarkable advances in radionuclide techniques and imaging equipment: from the first devices "home-mad...
A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain, 1945–1980
This book explores the under-researched history of male mental illness from the mid-twentieth century. It argues that statistics suggesting women have been more vulnerable to depression and anxiety are misleading since they underplay a host of alternative presentations of 'distress' more common in men....