Teaching Medicine and Medical Ethics Using Popular Culture

by Evie Kendal, Basia Diug

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Book Description

This book demonstrates how popular culture can be successfully incorporated into medical and health science curriculums, capitalising on the opportunity fictional media presents to humanise case studies. Studies show that the vast majority of medical and nursing students watch popular medical television dramas and comedies such as Grey’s Anatomy, ER, House M.D. and Scrubs. This affords us with a unique opportunity to engage and inform not only students but the general public and patients further downstream. This volume analyses examples of medical-themed popular culture and offers various strategies and methods for educators in this field to integrate this material into their teaching. The result is a fascinating read and original resource for medical professionals and teachers alike.

This open book is licensed under a Creative Commons License (CC BY). You can download Teaching Medicine and Medical Ethics Using Popular Culture ebook for free in PDF format (1.8 MB).

Book Details

Publisher
Palgrave Macmillan
Published
2017
Pages
180
Edition
1
Language
English
ISBN13
9783319654508
ISBN10
3319654500
ISBN13 Digital
9783319654515
ISBN10 Digital
3319654519
PDF Size
1.8 MB
License
CC BY

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